How I Spent My Weekend (Or; Behind The Scenes Of A Recording Session)

Another weekend has come and gone.

But, it did not go to waste.

I recorded some voices for two…Count ‘em; 1,2…Episodes!

Now, mind you we have not been picked up yet. I cannot tell you what the title is of anything we are working on yet (got to work out the copyright stuff). Granted, the sessions don’t take place in a real studio like Klasky Csupo. But, the recording sessions take do place in a [somewhat] soundproof room in an industrial park in the Chicago suburbs…Away from prying eyes.

Except your’s!

This is the very lovely, delightful, and talented Anita Nicole Brown! (Click on her name and you will see her credentials…Very impressive!)

(L to R) Scott James (THE sound guy), Mr. James Nickley; Jr. (The grand poobah), and his faithful assistant Harley Quinn (seated…on his lap)

And of course…Your’s truly; Turdbrain O’bannon  ME! What? No pop-screen?! I have been known to project my voice and over emphasize my “P’s”. No popping here! Scott is that good of a sound guy! But, it looks like I am having trouble pronouncing something… Me: “Duh…How do you pronounce this?”. JIM: “A”. ;)

Here’s the script of one of the episodes. As a reminder, I have the actual titles blocked until we get it copywritten (as of this writing)…and I am in dire need of a manicure (need to stop using a bastard file on the ol’ talons). We still have to edit and make it look presentable to the Library of Congress U.S. Copyright Office (correct spelling and grammar). Don’t want anyone to copy our writing! Capiche?

And there you have it!

That is just a small sample of what goes into a fledgling animation project.

I just want to say, personally, that when I work one of these sessions, I have some of the best times of my life! The companionship and camaraderie are second to none! I especially liked working with Anita. She is a true professional and, well…I am a huge fan! I kind of geek out every time I have to drive her from Chicago (I live on the Illinois/Wisconsin border) to the sessions some 15 or so extra miles away. Well, heck! I spent over 2 hours cleaning, vacuuming and deodorizing my bucket car for the first time in almost a year (the weather has been kind of wet) the day before. We had pleasant conversations about projects (very interesting), cracked jokes; we have kind of the same sense of humor. She thought it was funny when I referred to one of my iTunes playlists as “Middle-Aged White Man Music” (AC/DC, Kiss, Lenny Kravitz, Cycle Sluts from Hell). I let her choose the music, though; she likes swing, jazz, blues…So do I! I like all kinds of music…Seriously (except Abba, Tears For Fears, Blood Sweat and Tears, and techno…Bubblegum music and video game sounds-for-music are just not my bag). Our exchange in dialogue during the sessions were almost seamless. Her husband is a lucky guy (he deserves her. He’s a cop)!

Can you imagine if I do “make it” in the biz? And I have to ride to a session with someone like…oh a Maurice LaMarche, Tara Strong, Yeardley Smith, Townsend Coleman, or Nancy Cartwright?

The conversation with myself planning this in my penthouse in Century City would be like this:

"Hmm…Let’s see… A [stretch/armored] chrome Cadillac Maserati limo with tinted windows; none of that Mazda* crap! A driver; I have the worst luck with potholes and I tend to take the scenic route much to the chagrin of passenger(s). A killer sound system; Alpine or Blaupunkt with Sirius/XM and Bluetooth. No stock radio/CD player…and no “Middle-Aged White Man Music” on the iPhone either! Even if one of them likes Abba, play it and like it, dammit! Well, shoot! Better yet, hire a string quartet! They’ll play in the back seat! Cohiba and/or Montecristo cigars. Dunhill cigarettes. Espresso maker. Dom Perignon 2008, Johnny Walker Blue label, Stoli/Carpano Antica vermouth and fresh olives imported from Italy (no Jewel or Ralph’s crap) in the mini-bar with sterling silver martini shaker and crystal glasses. Puncture proof tires. Hot tub…Then we take the helicopter (with same bells and whistles) to the studio. Don’t forget the pilot…Yup! Time to look into a second mortgage just to pick up my colleagues!”

It is good to dream. Dreams are what make us strive and work harder to achieve what we want. If I had all the money in the world, I would have done all of that for Anita and anyone that I have worked with in past sessions. It is better to give than receive! Dammit! I love receiving, but I love giving even more!

Chase those dreams! Don’t let anyone or anything stand in your way! But, you will have to give it time and plan accordingly! Good things come to those who wait and work hard!

Who knows?

*Don’t get me wrong! Mazdas are very good on gas and offer Bluetooth standard. They have great stock sound systems also!

sept11memorials:

DENNIS P. MCHUGH, 34
World Trade Center: #Firefighter #FirstResponders #NeverForget
FDNY LADDER 13

There wasn’t much that Dennis P. McHugh, 34, couldn’t do. He ran the New York City Marathon, played Gaelic football, married the beautiful Una Hinchcliffe and became the proud father of Chloe, 5, and Sophie and Joseph, who both turned 1 last week. When he became a firefighter with Ladder Company 13 three years ago, “he was about as perfect as you can get,” said his friend Chris Gainer, who graduated from the Fire Academy with him and, in longstanding firehouse tradition, became “the bad probie” while Mr. McHugh was “the good probie.”

On summer mornings at the family place in Montauk, Mr. McHugh’s brothers-in-law would wake up and rush to the window, “to see if he’d done all the chores,” said Rob Hinchcliffe. “By the time we’d woken up at 11 o’clock, this guy had already painted the house and mowed the lawn. It was an ongoing joke. Dennis always made us look bad as sons.”

For the twins’ birthday, Mrs. McHugh asked everyone in the family to write down their memories of her husband. She has created a Web site, www.nyfdwidows.net, listing information about books and other ways to cope with loss, as another tribute to him. “He was always so optimistic,” she said. “He always saw the glass as half full.”

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on November 14, 2001.

Dennis P. McHugh Foundation:
http://www.dennispmchugh.org

(via peerintothepast)

This is a project that is being done by people that I have had the honor and privilege to work with. They are very talented and hard working. If you could donate just a few bucks, that would really help!

Oh! Don’t get the synopsis wrong! This is a short horror film! If you love suspense and horror, then this is an opportunity for you!

Check out the video on the web page, and you’ll see what makes this film unique as well as the talented people behind it!

http://www.seedandspark.com/studio/cheap-plastic-mask

Thank you! :)

sept11memorials:

EDWARD J. MARTINEZ
World Trade Center: #USNavy #Veteran #NeverForget
DRAPED AMERICAN FLAG ON HIS HOUSE

This is how much Edward J. Martinez of Elmhurst, Queens, knew how to appreciate the banquet of life: he carried a blanket in his car trunk so he would always be ready for a picnic. And with one of those aluminum-looking things that folds up into nothing, said his wife, Helen, wherever they went, biking in Connecticut, up to Vermont, he was ready. Also, there was a great list of things Mr. Martinez loved. He loved skiing, loved ice skating, loved to sky-dive, loved the opera. He lived, at 60, in the house he had grown up in on Cornish Avenue. He and his childhood friends from the block, now grown and married, formed themselves into an unofficial gang: the Screwball Club.

Mr. Martinez was an operations manager at Cantor Fitzgerald. His daughter Stephanie turned 18 four days after the attack on the World Trade Center. Mr. Martinez’s 20th wedding anniversary would have been Sept. 19. Friends came over on both occasions and, on the anniversary, took Mrs. Martinez and her daughter out to dinner.

A Navy veteran, Mr. Martinez could not bear two things: people who “dissed” America, and racist remarks. He draped a flag on his house on Memorial Day and kept it out all summer. As a memorial to her husband, Mrs. Martinez plans to leave the flag out year round.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on September 29, 2001.
http://www.legacy.com/sept11/Story.aspx?PersonID=96852&location=2

(via peerintothepast)

sept11memorials:

PHILIP W. MASTRANDREA JR., 42
World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Honor911 #CantorFitzgerald
A GENTLE GIANT

Philip W. Mastrandrea was a strong man — “a big bear of a guy” — but his greatest strength lay in his gentle nature. He had broad shoulders that anyone could lean on, nimble fingers that could skillfully braid his little girls’ hair.

"Philip was wonderful," said a relative who spoke on behalf of Mr. Mastrandrea’s wife, Karen.

"He was an incredible husband, a wonderful father, the son that everybody wishes for."

Mr. Mastrandrea, 42, of Chatham, worked on the 104th floor of One World Trade Center as a partner for Cantor Fitzgerald. The night before the attack was no different than any other, the relative said. He tucked his daughters — Paige, 8, and Sydney, 5 — into bed and kissed his wife. They would have been married for 15 years this October.

Mr. Mastrandrea was born in Brooklyn and attended Pace University in Long Island, N.Y. He had been a partner with Cantor Fitzgerald for the past 10 years, since about the time he and his wife moved to Chatham.

While he was successful in his professional life, he really judged his success by intangible things like the love and commitment he had for his family, his family said.

He was always ready with a joke and loved the beach. Among his hobbies were collecting watches and cars. They said Mr. Mastrandrea was very dependable and could be counted on at any hour of the day.

In addition to his wife and daughters, Mr. Mastrandrea is survived by his parents, Philip W. and Roz of Florham Park; and siblings, Robert and Lynn, both of Florham Park.

A memorial service will be held Friday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the atrium at Corpus Christ Church in Chatham Township. A memorial Mass will follow.

The family asks that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Philip W. Mastrandrea Scholarship Fund for World Trade Center Survivors, 7 Midwood Drive, Florham Park, N.J. 07932.
Profile by Paula Saha published in THE STAR-LEDGER.

(via peerintothepast)

sept11memorials:

CHARLES W. MATHERS, 61
World Trade Center: #USNavy #Veteran #NeverForget
VMI GRADUATE IN 1962

Here is the man you want in a crisis: while everyone squawks, he is listening. A great bear of a fellow, his eyes bright blue and calm, white- haired head nodding, he says, “Hmmmm.” Then, “I’ll take care of it.” And he does.

Charles Mathers, 61, whose quiet sparkle attracted innumerable friends, clients and employees, spent a lifetime handling crises. As a young man he served in the Navy for six years, much of it in a nuclear submarine. In Sea Girt, N.J., where he and Margaret, his wife of 39 years, raised three children, he was a volunteer firefighter for a quarter-century. He traveled around the world, consulting on insurance for utilities, including nuclear power plants.

But for all his responsibilities, Mr. Mathers, a managing director at Marsh & McLennan, was hardly slathered with gravitas. On the contrary.

This summer, at a conference of utility clients, insurers and brokers in Chicago, Mr. Mathers’s company was host to a dinner. Mr. Mathers made brief remarks and introduced an executive client. “And here’s one risk Chuck may not have considered,” the client said, then planted a shaving-cream pie in Mr. Mathers’s face. Several hundred otherwise staid people gasped and fell all over with laughter.

Mr. Mathers had planned the entire stunt.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on November 18, 2001.

(via peerintothepast)

sept11memorials:

ROBERT D. MATTSON, 54
World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Honor911 @USArmy #Veteran
BRONZE STAR FOR HEROISM IN VIETNAM

Robert D. Mattson did not seek out danger. But danger seemed to have a way of finding him. A lot of his friends managed to avoid Vietnam. He ended up over there in the Army, smack in the middle of harm’s way, came home with a Bronze Star for valor and some memories he would never share, not even with his wife, Elizabeth. “He would just slough it off as not worth talking about whenever I asked,” she said.

Then, in 1993, when terrorists attacked the World Trade Center the first time, with a truck bomb, Mr. Mattson, a banker with Fiduciary Trust Company International, found himself in harm’s way again. One of his co-workers in the stricken tower was eight and a half months pregnant, unable to make her way down 96 flights of stairs to the street after the elevators stopped. He was one of a handful of people who helped carry her up more than a dozen flights to the roof, where a helicopter plucked her to safety.

On Sept. 11, when the trade center was attacked again, Mr. Mattson called Mrs. Mattson on his cellphone a few minutes after the first plane had struck and told her not to worry, he was in no danger, the plane had hit the other tower. But just to be on the safe side, he said, he was leaving his building and, in fact, was already down to the 90th floor.

He was 54 and lived in the Green Pond section of Rockaway Township in New Jersey.

Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 22, 2001.

ROBERT MATTSON, 54, ‘ORDINARY GOOD GUY’
Robert D. Mattson was one of the last people to leave the World Trade Center when it was bombed by terrorists in 1993.

At that time, Mr. Mattson, a decorated Army veteran of Vietnam and longtime banker with Fiduciary Trust Company International, helped rescue a pregnant co-worker before being airlifted to safety from a rooftop.

"He was there in ‘93 and was the last one out," Mr. Mattson’s wife, Elizabeth, recalled. "An employee was 81/2 months pregnant, and he stayed with her. They carried her 16 flights to the roof. They came off the roof in a helicopter."

On Sept. 11, Mr. Mattson, a 54-year-old resident of the Green Pond section of Rockaway Township, was working on the 96th floor of the South Tower when the North Tower was struck by a hijacked plane. He spoke to his wife of 29 years to tell her he was all right and was making his way out of the building.

"He called me and said, ‘A plane hit Tower One. It’s not my building. I’m all right and I’m on my way out.’ He was on the 90th floor," Elizabeth Mattson said.

Then, the second airplane struck Two World Trade Center.

Though she may never know for sure, she has heard that her husband was once again trying to hasten the evacuation of others by “directing traffic” inside the building.

"He was a wonderful husband and a great father. He was just an ordinary good guy," she said.

Employed as a senior vice president for Fiduciary Trust, Mr. Mattson worked for the firm the past 30 years.

Mr. Mattson was born in Brooklyn, attended Cardinal Farley Military Academy in New York and graduated from the College of Santa Fe in New Mexico in 1969.

For his heroism in Vietnam, Mr. Mattson was awarded the Bronze Star.

During the past 21 years, Mr. Mattson lived in Green Pond, where he was a former president of the community’s board of directors. He also was a former Little League and basketball coach in Rockaway Township. Mr. Mattson was an avid runner and enjoyed playing tennis and golf.

Along with his wife, Mr. Mattson is survived by a daughter, Jean, 22, and a son, James, 21, both at home; his mother, Marguerite Mattson; and a brother, William Mattson, both of Staten Island, N.Y.

A memorial Mass will be held Saturday at 10:30 a.m. at St. Catherine of Siena Church in Mountain Lakes.

Profile by Jim Lockwood published in THE STAR-LEDGER.

(via peerintothepast)

sept11memorials:

WALTER A. MATUZA, 39
World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Honor911 #USNavy #Veteran 
HIS CHILDREN MEANT EVERYTHING TO HIM

Walter A. Matuza Jr., 39, of Great Kills, will be greatly missed by his family, especially his children and his nephews and nieces.

"He taught them how to fish, to golf. He took them camping," said his wife, the former Denise DePalma. "All his free time, he taught them how to do everything." Mr. Matuza was a telecommunications analyst at Carr Futures, a French brokerage firm on the 92nd floor of 1 World Trade Center, the north tower. Police confirmed his death yesterday.

Mrs. Matuza said she last heard from her husband on the morning of Sept. 11, when he called on his cell phone to tell her he was running down the stairs. “He just said the firemen were on the way, that the the floors were exploding,” she said.

She last saw him Monday evening, but most vividly remembers going to the Jets game with him Sunday. About 20 fellow employees of Carr Futures went to the game together and she was the only woman.

"We did everything together," she said.

All of the Carr Futures employees who went to the Jets game remain missing, she said.

After the towers collapsed, the family called his cell phone and sent messages to his pager, to no avail. His wife, his brother and a brother-in-law, bearing pictures, visited hospitals in the city and New Jersey.

"I just figured he would be home," she said.

"She went all over looking for him," said her mother, Georgette DePalma. "He was the best son-in-law a mother-in-law could ask for. I loved him, I love him, I will always love him and he will always be in my heart as long as I live," Mrs. DePalma said.

Mr. Matuza had donated computers to PS 8 and given some lectures there. Mr. Matuza was a part-time photographer for Emerald Studios, Eltingville. He was a manager for the South Shore YMCA baseball teams of his older sons, Walter, 9 and Jesse, 6. His third son is Nico, 3.

His children meant everything to him, his wife said.

The Navy veteran, of Staten Island, New York, was a parishioner of St. Clare’s R.C. Church, Great Kills. Surviving, in addition to his wife, Denise, and his three sons, are his parents, Angela Matuza-Sessa and Sal Sessa; two brothers, Thomas and Anthony Matuza, and a sister, Mary Jean Orafferty.

The funeral will be Tuesday from the John Vincent Scalia Home for Funerals, with a mass at 10 a.m. in St. Clare’s Church. Burial will follow in Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp.

Published: By Chan-joo Moon
Advance staff writer, silive.com 
Saturday, 09/22/2001

sept11memorials:

WALTER A. MATUZA, 39
World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Honor911 #USNavy #Veteran
HIS CHILDREN MEANT EVERYTHING TO HIM

Walter A. Matuza Jr., 39, of Great Kills, will be greatly missed by his family, especially his children and his nephews and nieces.

"He taught them how to fish, to golf. He took them camping," said his wife, the former Denise DePalma. "All his free time, he taught them how to do everything." Mr. Matuza was a telecommunications analyst at Carr Futures, a French brokerage firm on the 92nd floor of 1 World Trade Center, the north tower. Police confirmed his death yesterday.

Mrs. Matuza said she last heard from her husband on the morning of Sept. 11, when he called on his cell phone to tell her he was running down the stairs. “He just said the firemen were on the way, that the the floors were exploding,” she said.

She last saw him Monday evening, but most vividly remembers going to the Jets game with him Sunday. About 20 fellow employees of Carr Futures went to the game together and she was the only woman.

"We did everything together," she said.

All of the Carr Futures employees who went to the Jets game remain missing, she said.

After the towers collapsed, the family called his cell phone and sent messages to his pager, to no avail. His wife, his brother and a brother-in-law, bearing pictures, visited hospitals in the city and New Jersey.

"I just figured he would be home," she said.

"She went all over looking for him," said her mother, Georgette DePalma. "He was the best son-in-law a mother-in-law could ask for. I loved him, I love him, I will always love him and he will always be in my heart as long as I live," Mrs. DePalma said.

Mr. Matuza had donated computers to PS 8 and given some lectures there. Mr. Matuza was a part-time photographer for Emerald Studios, Eltingville. He was a manager for the South Shore YMCA baseball teams of his older sons, Walter, 9 and Jesse, 6. His third son is Nico, 3.

His children meant everything to him, his wife said.

The Navy veteran, of Staten Island, New York, was a parishioner of St. Clare’s R.C. Church, Great Kills. Surviving, in addition to his wife, Denise, and his three sons, are his parents, Angela Matuza-Sessa and Sal Sessa; two brothers, Thomas and Anthony Matuza, and a sister, Mary Jean Orafferty.

The funeral will be Tuesday from the John Vincent Scalia Home for Funerals, with a mass at 10 a.m. in St. Clare’s Church. Burial will follow in Moravian Cemetery, New Dorp.

Published: By Chan-joo Moon
Advance staff writer, silive.com
Saturday, 09/22/2001

(via peerintothepast)

sept11memorials:

CHARLES A. MAURO, JR., 65
World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Honor911 @USArmy #Veteran 
LOOKING TOWARD RETIREMENT
Charles A. Mauro Jr. had just started working as a senior client specialist for Aon Corp. eight weeks ago. The Eltingville resident was 65 years old — a time when most people start looking toward retirement. 

According to his wife, the former Dorothy Chiappone, Mr. Mauro wanted to stay busy and “not get stuck moping around the house,” so when his previous employer relocated, he decided to take a job on the 92nd floor of Tower 2 at the World Trade Center.

Mr. Mauro last spoke with his wife on the morning of Sept. 11, after the first plane hit Tower 1. “He was worried about me, that I was watching what was happening on TV,” Mrs. Mauro said. “He called from work to reassure me that everything was fine. He said that they had announced that everyone should stay in the building, that the building was secure and they would be fine,” she said. Now he is among the missing.

The Mauros, who would have celebrated their 28th wedding anniversary next weekend, didn’t get a chance to take a vacation this year because Mr. Mauro was about to start his new job. “We were going to wait to take a vacation,” Mrs. Mauro said. “This is why you shouldn’t wait.”

Mr. Mauro had previously been employed as an aviation underwriter, insuring small and mid-sized airplanes. He was employed from 1968 to 1977 for the U.S. Aircraft Insurance Group, Manhattan, and later for Associated Aviation Underwriters for 18 years. He stopped working in May when the company relocated to Bedminster, N.J.

Ironically, he decided not to follow the job because he felt the daily commute was too dangerous. “He didn’t want to drive with all the tractor trailers on the highway,” Mrs. Mauro said.

Mr. Mauro was remembered by his family as caring and wise.

"I will always remember my uncle for the heart-to-heart talks we used to have," said his niece, Suzanne Gergenti. "He always gave me good advice about my career and future. He will be deeply missed."

"He was my big brother, and I always looked up to him," said his sister, Nancy Sparozic. "When we were young, he would always let me get my way, because I was his little sister. He was a caring and gentle person, and I will miss him dearly."

Mrs. Mauro — like many grieving the loss of a loved one in this disaster — feels the hardest part of the whole tragedy is not having closure.

"Normally when a person dies, you can go to the funeral parlor, and then to mass, and have your friends and family comfort you, and then when it’s all over, you can go to the cemetery. And then you can go back and visit the cemetery and put flowers on the grave — I can’t do any of that," she said.

Born in Brooklyn, Mr. Mauro moved to Eltingville 28 years ago.

He served as a specialist third class in the Army from 1955 to 1957, stationed stateside, including at Fort Bragg, N.C.

He graduated from Pace University, Manhattan, with a degree in business administration.

He was a parishioner of Holy Child R.C. Church, Eltingville.

Mr. Mauro was an avid sports fan who loved the Giants, Knicks, Rangers and Yankees. He would read sports coverage in the city’s papers every day and would watch all sporting events on television, especially Monday Night Football.

"He was a warm-hearted, kind person," said his nephew, Michael Sparozic. "When he came over during the holidays, I looked forward to talking to him about sports, work or everyday life."

"He was a very loving and kind person," his wife said. "He thought of others before he thought of himself."

In addition to his wife, Dorothy, and his sister, Nancy, he is survived by his father, Charles A. Mauro Sr.

A memorial mass will be held Saturday at 1 p.m. in Holy Child Church. A celebration of his life will follow in the Marina Cafe, Great Kills.

By Maura Yates
Advance staff writer, silive.com
Monday, 10/01/2001

sept11memorials:

CHARLES A. MAURO, JR., 65
World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Honor911 @USArmy #Veteran
LOOKING TOWARD RETIREMENT
Charles A. Mauro Jr. had just started working as a senior client specialist for Aon Corp. eight weeks ago. The Eltingville resident was 65 years old — a time when most people start looking toward retirement.

According to his wife, the former Dorothy Chiappone, Mr. Mauro wanted to stay busy and “not get stuck moping around the house,” so when his previous employer relocated, he decided to take a job on the 92nd floor of Tower 2 at the World Trade Center.

Mr. Mauro last spoke with his wife on the morning of Sept. 11, after the first plane hit Tower 1. “He was worried about me, that I was watching what was happening on TV,” Mrs. Mauro said. “He called from work to reassure me that everything was fine. He said that they had announced that everyone should stay in the building, that the building was secure and they would be fine,” she said. Now he is among the missing.

The Mauros, who would have celebrated their 28th wedding anniversary next weekend, didn’t get a chance to take a vacation this year because Mr. Mauro was about to start his new job. “We were going to wait to take a vacation,” Mrs. Mauro said. “This is why you shouldn’t wait.”

Mr. Mauro had previously been employed as an aviation underwriter, insuring small and mid-sized airplanes. He was employed from 1968 to 1977 for the U.S. Aircraft Insurance Group, Manhattan, and later for Associated Aviation Underwriters for 18 years. He stopped working in May when the company relocated to Bedminster, N.J.

Ironically, he decided not to follow the job because he felt the daily commute was too dangerous. “He didn’t want to drive with all the tractor trailers on the highway,” Mrs. Mauro said.

Mr. Mauro was remembered by his family as caring and wise.

"I will always remember my uncle for the heart-to-heart talks we used to have," said his niece, Suzanne Gergenti. "He always gave me good advice about my career and future. He will be deeply missed."

"He was my big brother, and I always looked up to him," said his sister, Nancy Sparozic. "When we were young, he would always let me get my way, because I was his little sister. He was a caring and gentle person, and I will miss him dearly."

Mrs. Mauro — like many grieving the loss of a loved one in this disaster — feels the hardest part of the whole tragedy is not having closure.

"Normally when a person dies, you can go to the funeral parlor, and then to mass, and have your friends and family comfort you, and then when it’s all over, you can go to the cemetery. And then you can go back and visit the cemetery and put flowers on the grave — I can’t do any of that," she said.

Born in Brooklyn, Mr. Mauro moved to Eltingville 28 years ago.

He served as a specialist third class in the Army from 1955 to 1957, stationed stateside, including at Fort Bragg, N.C.

He graduated from Pace University, Manhattan, with a degree in business administration.

He was a parishioner of Holy Child R.C. Church, Eltingville.

Mr. Mauro was an avid sports fan who loved the Giants, Knicks, Rangers and Yankees. He would read sports coverage in the city’s papers every day and would watch all sporting events on television, especially Monday Night Football.

"He was a warm-hearted, kind person," said his nephew, Michael Sparozic. "When he came over during the holidays, I looked forward to talking to him about sports, work or everyday life."

"He was a very loving and kind person," his wife said. "He thought of others before he thought of himself."

In addition to his wife, Dorothy, and his sister, Nancy, he is survived by his father, Charles A. Mauro Sr.

A memorial mass will be held Saturday at 1 p.m. in Holy Child Church. A celebration of his life will follow in the Marina Cafe, Great Kills.

By Maura Yates
Advance staff writer, silive.com
Monday, 10/01/2001

(via peerintothepast)

sept11memorials:

KEITHROY MAYNARD
World Trade Center: #NeverForget #Firefighter #FirstResponder #Honor911
FDNY: ENGINE 33 
Keithroy Maynard was black. He was also a firefighter. Those two things meant everything to him, said his twin brother, Kevin.
“People do look to you,” he said. “You’re like a role model in a sense, especially in the black community where there aren’t many black firefighters.”
The New York Fire Department has been criticized for its lack of diversity. Firefighter Maynard was one of those determined to change that. After becoming a firefighter in 1999 at age 28, he joined the Vulcan Society, a group of black firefighters.
Mr. Maynard visited predominantly black neighborhoods to encourage others to take the Fire Department test. He worked with the Vulcan Society to train applicants to pass the department’s physical exam.
He was part of Engine 33 in the East Village, but he wanted to get posted to a firehouse in his home neighborhood of East Flatbush, Brooklyn, so that children there could know the life of a firefighter, his brother said.
Mr. Maynard was recruited by his father, a New York firefighter of 36 years. His father drove him to the fire academy at 5 a.m. on the first day of classes. Months after Mr. Maynard graduated, his father died, his final dream fulfilled.
Mr. Maynard’s dress uniform and spare work jacket now sit in his mother’s house. His nametags are on them. His brother said the only person who will be able to fill them is Mr. Maynard’s 6-year-old son, Keithroy Jr., another firefighter in the making.
Profile published in THE NEW YORK TIMES on December 8, 2001.

(via peerintothepast)